Dr. Lam Nutritional Coaching is the Leading Authority on Adrenal Fatigue

Do You Suffer From Any of These Symptoms?

Fatigue
Weight Gain
Irregular Blood Pressure
Anxiousness
Dizziness
Depressed Mood
If You Answered YES, Read On — This Could Change Your Life!
Learn what Adrenal Fatigue really is
What the warning, signs, and symptoms are, and HOW TO FIX IT 
Even if no one has ever been able to help you before!

Meet Dr. Michael Lam, M.D.

His journey to discover what REALLY happens to suffer from Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome saved his life.

“Let Me Tell You About My Story”

His Journey Could Change Your Life Too!
Dr. Lam Nutritional Coaching has helped thousands of people recover from the effects of Adrenal Fatigue to live better lives.
Learn How 1 Call and Just 5 Minutes Could Change Your Life.

Adrenal Fatigue Fundamentals:
What You Need to Know About It and 
How to Approach It

Are you one of the millions of Americans who:

  • Feel tired most of the time?
  • Can’t get a good night’s sleep?
  • Generally feel lethargic?
  • Often experience dizziness?
  • Get mildly anxious or depressed from time to time?
  • Have some kind of brain fog?
  • Can’t seem to lose weight?

These could be signs that you’re suffering from Adrenal Fatigue and either you don’t know it or you suspect it but can’t confirm it with your doctor.

The majority of adults suffer from this chronic condition at least once in their lives, and the challenge in tackling it is twofold:

  • Most people believe such symptoms are just part of leading a busy life with many responsibilities, or just part of getting older
  • The mainstream medical community hasn’t yet caught onto the condition and instead often writes these symptoms off as signs of some other issue, such as depression

But these symptoms are not a natural part of aging or leading a busy life. There is a reason behind these symptoms, there is a reason you’re not getting better even if you’re taking your supplements and exercising regularly, and there’s a reason why you can’t find the help you need.

At this time, Adrenal Fatigue has not yet been recognized by mainstream medicine, and most conventional physicians have not been taught anything about it in medical school.

This pattern has happened in the past with many chronic conditions. It sometimes takes decades for mainstream medicine to accept patients’ legitimate concerns with a yet-unrecognized condition.

A similar path happened with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome many years ago, for example, until health professionals began to take their patients’ experience more seriously and realized that such vast numbers of similar complaints must mean something.

But for the time being, most sufferers of Adrenal Fatigue or adrenal burnout will have trouble finding the validation and relief they need. Instead, they will be met with skepticism or, worse, be misdiagnosed. Most sufferers will go to their healthcare provider with different Adrenal Fatigue symptoms and get one or several tests done. The results are likely to rule out other conditions but fail to solve their primary problem.

What Is Adrenal Fatigue?

Adrenal Fatigue is the non-Addison’s form of adrenal dysfunction, a condition where the body’s stress response cannot keep up with life’s chronic stressors. This condition leads to a syndrome or collection of symptoms that can seriously affect your quality of life.

Adrenal Fatigue is often called a sub-clinical syndrome, a condition that stays “below the surface” of clinical detection.

Unfortunately, conventional medicine does not recognize Adrenal Fatigue as a medical condition like Addison’s disease, also known as adrenal insufficiency. As such, do not be surprised if your doctor is unfamiliar with this condition.

Debunking the Myths: 
What Adrenal Fatigue is and isn’t

Even though Adrenal Fatigue is not yet recognized by mainstream medicine, it doesn’t mean that it’s not real. From the decades of my own experience with sufferers, as well as the experiences of scores of other health professionals that deal with and recognize this condition, I believe it’s only a matter of time until it becomes accepted by the mainstream medical community.

Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome (AFS) is a chronic condition that manifests in many nonspecific symptoms that vary in severity and effect. It is referred to as a syndrome precisely because of the different symptoms that sufferers have in common, symptoms that frequently come together, even if, at first, they don’t seem to come from any one specific cause.

And that’s the crucial difference between seeing a health professional with experience in AFS and one that has no experience in it. The one with experience will understand that this condition’s diagnosis has to be a holistic one, considering your whole person, mind, body, and spirit. They are focused on understanding how the different symptoms tie together and the various stressors contribute to the condition’s development.

Your primary care physician will run standard blood tests, such as the ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) challenge test, which looks for extreme underproduction or overproduction of hormone levels — the top and bottom two percent of a bell curve. These tests won’t detect adrenal dysregulation that is less extreme than Addison’s Disease or Cushing’s Disease.

Addison’s Disease, also called adrenal insufficiency, is a severe endocrine condition where your adrenal glands don’t produce enough adrenal hormones, usually due to autoimmunity. Cushing’s Disease, on the other hand, is when your adrenals produce extreme and excessive amounts of adrenal hormones.

Although cortisol levels do go outside of normal ranges in AFS, usually increasing at first then dropping when the condition is more advanced, symptoms can begin to show up after a 15 percent deviation from the mean on the bell curve and this won’t be detected by the ACTH test.

Other lab tests, such as those that measure cortisol levels in the blood or saliva, can also be misleading. That’s because cortisol levels naturally fluctuate throughout the day, and they also greatly vary from person to person and situation to situation.

That’s why you need the eyes of an experienced clinician who will look at your history and the full picture of your current health to make an accurate diagnosis, and then, if needed, use lab tests as support.

“One of the reasons I have come to specialize in Adrenal Fatigue is because of how it has affected my own life. I have been dealing with it professionally for decades, and I also have personal experience with it.
“Many years ago, at the prime of my life, I was hit with extreme exhaustion while on vacation with my family in Mexico. I was stranded in a forgein country unable to fend for myself, and without any knowledge of what was happening to me. My wife and I were so frustrated with the lack of information and help available for my debilitated state. We had no other option but to research my condition and experiment with different recovery techniques ourselves. My background as a trained medical doctor who also uses natural medicine, along with my wife’s experience as a nutritionist, helped me make a full recovery. I was later able to turn the protocol we used during my illness into a pattern that has helped thousands of others suffering from the same condition.”
— Dr. Michael Lam, MD, MPH

The Different Causes of Adrenal Fatigue

Although AFS is caused by chronic stress, you can’t simply use relaxation techniques to recover from this often debilitating condition. And suppose your doctor sends you home with some antidepressants or anti-anxiety medications and tells you to manage your stress. In that case, you run the risk of eventually reaching adrenal exhaustion and maybe even becoming bedridden, with no help in sight.

That’s why understanding exactly how chronic stress affects your adrenal glands, and your body in general, is the key to understanding AFS. It will also help you approach the recovery process more holistically and intelligently. When I talk about chronic stress as the cause of AFS, I mean any stressor that your body is exposed to on a consistent basis. This includes stressors such as:

  • An unhealthy diet
  • Overconsumption of sugar, refined carbs, and processed foods
  • Food sensitivities, such as to gluten or dairy
  • A sedentary lifestyle
  • Excessive exercise
  • Anger, fear, guilt, shame, depression, and any other extreme emotional states
  • Chronic psychological stress
  • Chronic pain
  • Exposure to toxins
  • Chronic infections
  • Injury
  • Surgery
  • Sleep disorders
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Chronic illness
  • Consumption of alcohol and/or recreational drugs
  • Certain medications
  • Chronic dental infections
  • Poor blood sugar control
  • Malabsorption
  • Digestive issues
  • Excessive caffeine intake

But how do these stressors lead to Adrenal Fatigue? It has to do with your body’s built-in stress-coping mechanism: The NeuroEndoMetabolic (NEM) Stress Response. Your NEM is composed of the following six circuits of organs and systems that work together to fight stress:

  • The Hormone Circuit
  • The Bioenergetics Circuit
  • The Neuroaffect Circuit
  • The Cardionomic Circuit
  • The Inflammation Circuit
  • The Detoxification Circuit

Although all six are engaged when your body is facing any of the above-listed stressors, the adrenal glands, which are part of the Hormone circuit, are usually the first responders and also the ones that bear that biggest share of the workload.

The adrenal glands produce cortisol, the main anti stress hormone of the body. When the body is stressed, cortisol is released. However, cortisol is only meant to be released as a short term solution. It is not meant to deal with chronic stress. When the body continually undergoes stress for an extended period of time. The adrenal glands can start to fatigue and the cortisol production can start to falter. This can lead to a variety of different symptoms.

No One Has Been Able to Help Me.
My Doctor Doesn’t Even Believe Me!

Because Adrenal Fatigue is not yet recognized by mainstream medicine, most mainstream medical professionals are not trained in helping you. We have seen thousands of people go to doctor after doctor, only to be turned away and ignored, which can leave you feeling hopeless and make your condition worse. Those lucky enough to get help often don’t have a professional experienced enough to guide them in their recovery.
So, if your doctor says your tests results fall into standard ranges and doesn’t have any answers for you, we can probably help.
At Dr. Lam Coaching, we have over 50 years of combined experience in helping people get their energy, vitality, and life back.
Dr. Lam Nutritional Coaching has helped thousands of people recover from the effects of Adrenal Fatigue to live better lives.
CLICK HERE TO Learn How 1 Call and 
JUST 5 MINUTES Could Change Your Life

The Signs and Symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue

Other than a general feeling of fatigue, lack of energy, and lethargy, which are the hallmarks of this condition, the following is a list of the different symptoms you can experience with AFS. These range in severity depending on how advanced your condition is:

  • A tendency to gain weight and inability to lose it, especially around the waist
  • A tendency to tremble when under pressure
  • Reduced sex drive
  • Lightheaded when rising from a lying-down position
  • Unable to remember things
  • Lack of energy in the mornings and also in the afternoon between 3 to 5 pm
  • You feel better suddenly for a brief period after a meal
  • Often feel tired between 9 - 10 pm, but resist going to bed
  • Need coffee or stimulants to get going in the morning
  • Cravings for salty, fatty, and high protein food such as meat and cheese
  • Increased symptoms of PMS for women; periods are heavy and then stop, or almost stop on the 4th day, only to start flowing again on the 5th or 6th day
  • Pain in the upper back or neck for no apparent reason
  • You tend to feel better when stress is relieved, such as on a vacation
  • Difficulties in getting up in the morning
  • Lightheadedness

To find out more about each symptom, take Dr. Lam’s 3-minute Adrenal Fatigue test here to determine if you have Adrenal Fatigue.

Most people will not have all of these symptoms, but if you find yourself with many of them, you likely have AFS. And even though these symptoms do not automatically mean you have the condition instead of something else, an experienced health professional will use them, along with your medical history and current situation, to make a diagnosis and come up with a plan of care.

Success Stories...

"So far I hadn’t found anybody that could help me and the other naturopaths wanted to give me things that were stimulating.
"The Lams… improved my life greatly… They are there for you weekly, if you have a problem you can ask them."
"I had tried four other doctors... but nobody knew about it.
"Within 2 weeks my hair stopped falling out, within 2 months… I could just feel more balance."
Dr. Lam Nutritional Coaching has helped thousands of people recover from the effects of Adrenal Fatigue to live better lives.
CLICK HERE TO LEARN HOW 1 CALL AND
JUST 5 MINUTES COULD CHANGE YOUR LIFE

How Do You Heal Adrenal Fatigue?

Although how you manage Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome (AFS) will vary depending on the condition and needs of each individual, some fundamentals should be part of any AFS recovery protocol:

1. Reducing Stress

Unless you reduce or remove the stressors that have caused AFS in the first place, the stress will keep causing problems.

Suppose the stressors are physical in nature, such as suffering from recurrent infections or chronic conditions. In that case, this will require the help of a clinician experienced in such issues who can help you recover from them without damaging your health in the process.

Suppose the stressors are situational, such as marital or financial pressures. In that case, you will need to find ways to reduce the stress of those situations, such as utilizing the resources and support systems available in your community. If the stressors are psychological, such as suffering from depression or anger issues, it may be time to get therapy or join a group support program.

Sometimes removing stressors is impossible right now, in which case, the best thing you can do for your body is to work on developing techniques that improve your ability to cope with stress. Using relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, meditation, journaling, visualization, and yoga, can also be added to the above to help you cope with and reduce your life stress.

2. Switching to the Adrenal Fatigue Diet

The cornerstone of AFS recovery is the diet, and it’s not just about what you eat. It’s also about what you eliminate from your diet and the timing of your meals.

The first step in lessening the burden on your adrenal glands is to lessen inflammation in the gut, and that will happen naturally as you get rid of inflammatory foods and drinks, such as gluten, dairy, sugar, deep-fried foods, refined carbohydrates, alcohol, sodas, and any food or drink with chemical additives like artificial flavors, artificial sweeteners, and artificial colors.

Next, you’ll want your diet to be composed of:

  • 30-40% vegetables (half raw, half cooked)
  • 20-30% animal protein
  • 20-30% healthy fats, like nuts and seeds
  • 10-20% legumes and beans
  • 10-20% whole grains
  • 10-15% whole fruits

It’s also important to eat throughout the day with AFS. Although intermittent fasting is very popular these days, with a condition like AFS, your energy and nutrition stores are depleted, so you need to make sure you replenish them consistently. You should also be eating something every three or four hours to maintain stable blood sugar levels.

Don’t skip breakfast. Try to have a healthy, protein-rich breakfast as soon after waking up as you can. Assuming you wake at about 9 a.m., eat breakfast no later than 10 a.m. If you eat a very early breakfast, like at 6 or 7 a.m., then you should have a snack around 10 a.m. Lunch is best between 11 and 11:30 a.m., then have another snack between 2 to 3 p.m. to keep your energy levels going during the afternoon slump. Dinner between 5 and 6 p.m. is ideal, and, like most other meals, should be low on the glycemic index. You can have a light snack of soaked nuts or seeds before bed to ensure your blood sugar levels don’t drop while you’re sleeping.

3. Getting Enough Good-Quality Sleep

Recovering from any chronic condition requires a lot of rest and sleep, and this is doubly so if you’re recovering from AFS because of the lack of energy involved. Some tips to get good quality sleep are:

  • Avoid caffeine as much as possible.
  • Try to be in bed by 10 p.m.
  • Try to sleep in until 9 a.m.
  • Keep the same sleep schedule every day.
  • Stop using digital devices at least two hours before bed.
  • Keep your room cool and dark.
  • Don’t turn on the light when going to the bathroom in the middle of the night; use a nightlight instead.
  • Read a soothing book or meditate before bed to relax your body and mind.
  • Stop drinking water two hours before bed to avoid waking to use the bathroom, but make sure you have plenty of water throughout the day otherwise.

You should also allow yourself to rest during the day if you feel the need to.

4. Doing the Right Kind of Exercise

Depending on how advanced your AFS is, it can be best to do either very mild exercises or none at all at first. If you’re bedridden, then it’s best to avoid exercise until you have more energy. If your Adrenal Fatigue is advanced but you’re not bedridden, very gentle adrenal breathing and adrenal yoga exercises may help you feel better. Once your adrenals are stronger, you can increase your physical activity’s length or intensity, perhaps taking walks in nature or doing more rigorous yoga forms.

5. Taking the Right Supplements

Supplements can help fill in any nutritional gaps in your diet or give you a therapeutic boost when needed. In AFS recovery, different types of vitamins, minerals, nutrients, herbs, glandulars, hormones, and steroids can be given as supplements, depending on your condition and needs.

Some of the most commonly used supplements in AFS recovery include vitamin C, vitamin B5, glutathione, vitamin E, vitamin D, adrenal glandulars, and adaptogenic herbs such as ashwagandha and rhodiola. Other nutrients you can consider are collagen types I and III, DHEA, and CoQ.

Vitamins and minerals are the least risky supplements, but they can still lead to paradoxical reactions if your body is very fragile or if the combination taken is not right for you. That’s why even something like vitamin C should be taken under supervision.

Hormones and prohormones such as pregnenolone, estrogen, testosterone, and progesterone can also be considered, though they can pose a risk of masking the problem rather than actually allowing your body to balance its hormone production naturally, and so should only be used if the benefits outweigh the risks.

Less commonly used are steroids, such as hydrocortisone, which can give you a big push at first but can then leave you dependent. Your recovery would then stand on the crutches of these kinds of supplements and may not stand on its own if you stop taking them. In some cases, it may be a good idea, but only if under the guidance of an experienced professional who has a long-term plan in mind for you.

How Long Will It Take for Me to See Results?

The symptoms you have are real, and this is not an overnight fix. We take a long-term approach to maximizing your complete recovery.
For most people, we map out a coaching program over a period of 12 weeks, or about three months. During that time, we will work with you closely on a comprehensive plan to get you feeling better and improving your life.
The body is constantly changing, and the symptoms you experience today may change tomorrow. That is why we have a comprehensive plan with close follow-ups to make sure you are getting the right care. If something comes up, we are there to catch it and make the proper changes right away.
It can be done — it just takes patience, empathy, and the right kind of support. So, don’t hesitate to look for this support, even if you’ve been let down many times before.
Dr. Lam Nutritional Coaching has helped thousands of people recover from the effects of Adrenal Fatigue to live better lives.
CLICK HERE TO LEARN HOW 1 CALL AND
JUST 5 MINUTES COULD CHANGE YOUR LIFE

What Does Adrenal Fatigue Feel Like?

Many AFS sufferers complain about a general feeling of weakness, a reduced ability to function well or to enjoy their lives, and the sensation that they just can’t reach true wellbeing no matter what they do. The symptoms can be many, some may be severe, and because they can be so varied, many sufferers are confused and feel hopelessly unable to control their own bodies.

This is why getting the right kind of support from someone who has had professional and even personal experience with the condition can make the difference between prolonged suffering and really thriving again. It will take time, but a natural and holistic approach can empower you to take your health back into your own hands and better equip you to handle the lows as you look forward to overall improvement.

Adrenal Insufficiency:
What It Is and The Most Common Causes

It is important to note, Adrenal Fatigue is not adrenal insufficiency. But, it’s good to understand some of the causes of primary and secondary adrenal insufficiency so you can distinguish between this and AFS.

Primary adrenal insufficiency occurs when the adrenal cortex is damaged, and that usually happens due to an autoimmune attack. Also, primary adrenal insufficiency can be caused by cancer of the adrenal glands, severe infection in the adrenal glands, tuberculosis, or bleeding into the adrenal glands.

Secondary adrenal insufficiency occurs when the pituitary gland doesn’t produce enough ACTH to stimulate the adrenals into producing enough adrenal hormones. This usually happens when something affects the pituitary gland itself, such as a tumor, surgery, or inflammation, rather than the adrenal glands. Taking corticosteroids to help with another condition can also lead to secondary adrenal insufficiency.

This, as noted above, is distinct from what happens when chronic stress causes the body to produce too much or too little adrenal hormones due to overwork as in Adrenal Fatigue.

Even MORE Success Stories...

"I first noticed at the end of 2 weeks a little bit of improvement…"
Dr. Lam Nutritional Coaching has helped thousands of people recover from the effects of Adrenal Fatigue to live better lives.
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JUST 5 MINUTES COULD CHANGE YOUR LIFE

You Can Recover

Adrenal Fatigue is a very common condition that can range from the early stages with nearly undetectable symptoms to advanced stages with debilitating symptoms. Because it is not yet recognized by mainstream medicine, most mainstream medical professionals are not trained in diagnosing or treating it, which can leave you feeling hopeless and make your condition worse.
"I experienced this condition first hand, and I was fortunate that as a trained medical doctor and a proponent of natural medicine, I had the tools available to me to come up with a holistic recovery protocol. This has helped me help many of my clients not only overcome Adrenal Fatigue but lead even healthier lives than before."
— Dr. Michael Lam, MD, MPH
You can recover — it just takes patience, empathy, and the right kind of support. So don’t hesitate to look for help, even if you’ve been let down many times before.
Dr. Lam Nutritional Coaching has helped thousands of people recover from the effects of Adrenal Fatigue to live better lives.
CLICK HERE TO LEARN HOW 1 CALL AND
JUST 5 MINUTES COULD CHANGE YOUR LIFE

Frequently Asked Questions and Answers About Adrenal Fatigue

What is Adrenal Fatigue?

Adrenal Fatigue is the non-Addison’s form of adrenal dysfunction, a condition where the body’s stress response cannot keep up with life’s chronic stressors. This condition leads to a syndrome or collection of symptoms that can seriously affect your quality of life.

Adrenal Fatigue is often called a sub-clinical syndrome, a condition that stays “below the surface” of clinical detection.

Unfortunately, conventional medicine does not recognize Adrenal Fatigue as a medical condition like Addison’s disease, also known as adrenal insufficiency. As such, do not be surprised if your doctor is unfamiliar with this condition.

What is Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome?

Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome (AFS) is a collection of non-specific yet often debilitating adrenal dysfunction symptoms. It is not a myth but rather an increasingly common and often debilitating condition.

Fatigue and lethargy are the most common complaints amongst adults. If you have symptoms such as tiredness, fearfulness, allergies, frequent getting sick, aches and pains of unknown origin, anxiousness, depressed mood, reduced memory and difficulties in concentrating, difficulty sleeping, inability to lose weight, you may be suffering from Adrenal Fatigue. The onset of Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome is often slow and insidious.

Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome should not be confused with another medical condition called Addison’s disease, where the adrenal glands are not functioning. While Addison’s disease is often caused by autoimmune dysfunction, Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome is primarily driven by stress.

What causes Adrenal Fatigue?

Adrenal Fatigue is primarily caused by chronic stress, which is very common in society. The most common causes of stress are work pressure, the death of a loved one, moving homes, changing jobs, illness, and marital disruptions. Adrenal Fatigue occurs when the amount of stress exceeds the body’s capacity to compensate and recover from stress.

What are the stressors that can lead to Adrenal Fatigue?

The stressors that can lead to Adrenal Fatigue include:

  • Anger
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Chronic illness
  • Chronic infection
  • Chronic pain
  • Depression
  • Excessive exercise
  • Fear and guilt
  • Gluten intolerance
  • Low blood sugar
  • Mal-absorption
  • Mal-digestion
  • Toxic exposure
  • Severe or chronic stress
  • Surgery
  • Late hours
  • Sleep deprivation
  • Excessive sugar in the diet
  • Excessive caffeine intake from coffee and tea

Anyone can suffer from Adrenal Fatigue at some point. It is often triggered by an acute illness or stressful situation, like a life crisis, surgery, stressful demand of a job, or relationship problems. Adrenal fatigue can affect anybody, from teenagers to grandmothers. Most commonly, it affects those 30 and above. Women are more prone to get Adrenal Fatigue than men. This condition can be made worse by an unhealthy lifestyle, such as poor diet, substance abuse, inadequate sleep, or chronic illness, just to name a few.

How common is Adrenal Fatigue?

It is estimated that 80% of adults in developed and modern countries suffer from Adrenal Fatigue at some point in their life. This condition is often temporary, lasting a few days or weeks. A small number fail to recover, and this condition lingers on unresolved, leading to a chronic and debilitated state.

How can you know if you have Adrenal Fatigue?

You may be suffering from Adrenal Fatigue if you regularly experience one or more of the following symptoms:

  • A tendency to gain weight and unable to lose it, especially around the waist
  • A tendency to tremble when under pressure
  • Reduced sex drive
  • Lightheaded when rising from a laying down position
  • Unable to remember things
  • Lack of energy in the mornings and also in the afternoon between 3 to 5 pm
  • You feel better suddenly for a brief period after a meal
  • Often feel tired between 9 - 10 pm, but resist going to bed
  • Need coffee or stimulants to get going in the morning
  • Crave for salty, fatty, and high protein food such as meat and cheese
  • Increase symptoms of PMS for women; periods are heavy and then stop, or almost stopped on the 4th day, only to start flow again on the 5th or 6th day
  • Pain in the upper back or neck with no apparent reasons
  • You tend to feel better when stress is relieved, such as on a vacation
  • Difficulties in getting up in the morning
  • Lightheadedness

To find out more about each symptom, take Dr. Lam’s 3-minute Adrenal Fatigue test here to determine if you have Adrenal Fatigue.

What are the health conditions related to Adrenal Fatigue?

Conditions commonly associated with Adrenal Fatigue include hypothyroidism, estrogen dominance, PMS, endometriosis, chronic fatigue syndrome, chronic pain syndrome, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.

Can people with Adrenal Fatigue recover fully?

Yes, with proper care, most people can fully recover from Adrenal Fatigue. The younger you are, the better the potential. The milder the form, the better the chances. Those with advanced stages can recover as well, but it can take a longer time to do so.

Is laboratory testing required for Adrenal Fatigue?

Lab testing is not required but can be beneficial. Due to tremendous individual variance and the body’s constant changing state, laboratory tests should be undertaken judiciously under the right setting and only when needed in order to be cost-effective and relevant. It is not uncommon to have Adrenal Fatigue symptoms with “normal” laboratory results and vice versa.

The best way to test your adrenal health is to measure your level of free key adrenal hormones such as cortisol and DHEA. Saliva testing is preferred as it measures the amount of free and circulating hormones instead of the bound hormones commonly measured in a blood test.

Laboratory tests are best used as supporting tools under the guidance of the right health professional and should not be relied on as a helpful gauge of adrenal function and recovery options. Consumers often make the mistake of embarking on a self-guided nutritional recovery program that relies on laboratory tests without understanding their limitations. Over time, this approach often leads to improper use of nutrients which may make the condition worse.

Is nutritional supplementation needed for Adrenal Fatigue?

Nutritional supplementation can play an important role in adrenal recovery. Beneficial nutrients include vitamin C, vitamin B5, pantetheine, magnesium, pregnenolone, DHEA, adrenal cortex, various herbs, and cortisol. Dosages of each vary significantly from person to person.

It is essential to understand that a shot-gun approach by taking many nutrients simultaneously seldom works and may even backfire. The use of nutritional supplementation in overcoming Adrenal Fatigue needs to be individualized, based on each person’s history, background, and body metabolic system. One person’s nutrient may be another person’s toxin. Each nutrient is like one bullet in the arsenal. Using the right bullet at the right time is critical because there are not many bullets available.

Many people simply take the whole battery of nutrients without this consideration, and that approach seldom works long term in the case of Adrenal Fatigue. Even if some nutrients appear to work well initially, they may fail as the body develops tolerance. More is not necessarily better and may make things worse in many cases because during the recovery process, the metabolism changes. It is vital to match the dosage to the metabolic throughout the entire journey for maximum effectiveness.

In Adrenal Fatigue, the body’s ability to process and assimilate nutrients is often compromised. Initially, we’ll use testing doses to see the amount of reserve the adrenal has before applying any high-dose nutrient. Proper nutritional dosages should be administered in a graded and stepwise approach, with follow-up care provided by the health care professional.

What is the best way to overcome Adrenal Fatigue?

The number one cause of Adrenal Fatigue is chronic stress. Removal of the stressor is the best way to overcome Adrenal Fatigue. There are numerous lifestyle changes and dietary tips that can be helpful. For most mild cases, this is often sufficient. If this is not sufficient, then nutritional supplementation should be considered. It is best to work with an experienced health professional to ensure you are on the right track in your recovery.

What are special considerations of women afflicted with Adrenal Fatigue?

There are solid interlinked relationships between the ovarian, adrenal, and thyroid systems in women. These three organs are intimately co-dependent on each other for optimal function. This axis, also called the Ovarian Adrenal and Thyroid axis (OAT), must be balanced if a woman wants to feel good.

When medication alters one of the organ’s functions, it will invariably lead to an often-unrecognized change in the other two organs. For example, if thyroid medication is administered, it is not uncommon to see concurrent menstrual irregularities (a function of ovarian hormones) and reduced ability to deal with stress (a function of the adrenals).

With Adrenal Fatigue, internal cortisol often creates a condition of multiple organ resistance, including the thyroid and ovaries. Thyroid tissues fail to respond as efficiently to the hormonal signal. Adrenal Fatigue is often accompanied by clinical or sub-clinical hypothyroidism.

What are Signs and Symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue?

  • A tendency to gain weight and unable to lose it, especially around the waist
  • A tendency to tremble when under pressure
  • Reduced sex drive
  • Lightheaded when rising from a laying down position
  • Unable to remember things
  • Lack of energy in the mornings and also in the afternoon between 3 to 5 pm
  • You feel better suddenly for a brief period after a meal
  • Often feel tired between 9 - 10 pm, but resist going to bed
  • Need coffee or stimulants to get going in the morning
  • Crave for salty, fatty, and high protein food such as meat and cheese
  • Increase symptoms of PMS for women; periods are heavy and then stop, or almost stopped on the 4th day, only to start flow again on the 5th or 6th day
  • Pain in the upper back or neck with no apparent reasons
  • You tend to feel better stress is relieved, such as on a vacation
  • Difficulties in getting up in the morning
  • Lightheadedness

To find out more about each symptom, take Dr. Lam’s 3-minute Adrenal Fatigue test here to determine if you have Adrenal Fatigue.

What are some of the less commonly reported or unusual symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue?

In Adrenal Fatigue, the body can often exhibit multiple paradoxical reactions that one does not normally expect. These are more frequent when the condition is advanced. These include:

  • A sense of fatigue or malaise instead of a sense of calm when taking steroids
  • Sudden onset of anxiousness and impending doom at rest
  • Sudden onset of heart palpitations despite normal cardiac function
  • Sudden onset of dizziness and lightheadedness at rest
  • Sudden onset of fluctuating blood pressure
  • Being constipated instead of having loose bowel when taking high doses of vitamin C or magnesium
  • A sense of getting wired up and anxious after taking Vitamin C, adrenal glandular, or herbs
  • A sense of well-being after taking selected nutrients, only to be followed by a "crash"

One can have any combination of the above. The exact reason for each of these symptoms is not fully known. Collectively, they point to an adrenal that has lost its ability to maintain the fine control necessary of a stable internal homeostasis environment. Self-directed recovery programs usually fail in such cases because normal healing tools do not apply. It is best to consult a professional for help if you have many paradoxical reactions.

To find out more about each symptom, take Dr. Lam’s 3-minute Adrenal Fatigue test here to determine if you have Adrenal Fatigue.

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